Missing Children: What Can We Do Next?

According to statistics from Missing Kids UK, a child goes missing in the UK every three minutes. One in five of these children are at risk of being sexually exploited. This means it’s vital for everyone to act from the get go.

In a recent survey, 100% of users said they knew who Madeline McCann was whilst 47% said they knew who Ben Needham was – both children from England who went missing abroad. This goes to show that the coverage some missing children receive are far greater than others.

One user said “This is sad but interesting case. I cannot put myself in her parents shoes, any child that goes missing must be heartbreaking. However so much money has already been used to try and look for her, it’s so sad and as hard as it is it’s time to move onto other cases. What about all those other children that are missing?.”

Another added “Definitely agree here. While I think it’s subjective in terms of us seeing certain priority cases, I do think there needs to be more equality in terms of the cases.”

Maddie’s case has had the spotlight for quite a while, almost 11 years to be exact yet Ben Needham who has been missing for 27 years has nowhere near as much media attention as the McCanns. As users quite rightly said, it doesn’t mean we can’t look for Maddie – she deserves to be found, but sometimes there needs to be more equality in cases.

In the survey, 11% said enough money was being spent on missing children whilst 53% said there wasn’t. 94% then said that “given an average expenditure of £2,500 is spent on each missing persons case”, it is not fair “the McCanns have been given funds worth over £11 million”.

It’s clear people have different views when it comes to funds and missing people, but the majority agree that despite wanting Maddie home safe, perhaps the funds should be split evenly between cases. One user asked which organisations could help small cases become more known and suggested rather than teaching children just to  ‘stay away from strangers’ , to teach them ways to escape if they’re kidnapped or how to seek help without harming or putting themselves in danger.

To answer that question, yes there are organisations (and campaigns) that can help. Situations like these make you question humanity. Did you know children as young as six-years-old are at risk of being sexually exploited? Thorn is a campaign that leverages technology to combat the sexual exploitation of children. They work with people from tech companies, the government and NGOs they where they work to stop the spread of child sexual abuse material and stand up to child traffickers

I think that schools should make people more aware of them and teach children tips/tricks of how to escape. Signs that a certain situation isn’t right. At the end of the day we can only tell our kids how to protect themselves – don’t open the door for strangers, don’t run outside, don’t go where we can’t see you, etc…

Maybe it’s time to sit down and tell them about these cases. Show they that there are bad people out there and this is what you should do if it happens to you.

Read the original article here: Why We Need To Focus On Other Missing Children, 

Sophie

Mainly blog about skin-care & travel. You may have noticed my obsession with Paris, chocolate and tea…

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Survey (linked above) had 19 respondents.

7 Comments

  1. 18th March 2018 / 10:00 pm

    I completely agree all cases should get the same amount of exposure as then there could be a possibility of that child being found, though I know in some cases sadly that doesn’t happen. I also agree that, as sad it may be that we have to, children should be taught or shown what to do in certain situations to protect and save themselves!

    http://planetvikkiblog.wordpress.com

    • 19th March 2018 / 7:47 am

      Agreed! Definitely should be self defence classes, etc. in school. Definitely could save lives

  2. 14th February 2018 / 2:17 pm

    I love that you’re continuing to raise awareness for this and it is so important to discuss this topic in the way you are. I really hate that some cases are put first over others which are equally important.

    Faye Jessica | fayejessica.co.uk

  3. 11th February 2018 / 5:49 pm

    Sophie I love this post so much!
    Honestly I couldn’t agree more, I think the amount of money that has been spent on the search for Madeleine is ridiculous and it’s incredibly unfair to all those families who’s child is still missing yet nobody is doing anything about it.

    We fight so hard for gender and race equality when we should be fighting for equality overall.

    Hann xx
    atinygirlsbigworld.wordpress.com

  4. 11th February 2018 / 3:14 pm

    It’s not surprising to me that there are some cases more publicized than others, that is the case in any type of crime. You’ll hear about some robberies more than others, some assaults while others never make the news… that being said, it’s not ‘right,’ but can you imagine the news if they tried to discuss everything. BUT – it irks me that the same case will be discussed 5 times when another case doesn’t get any attention. There has to be some sort of happy medium.
    Britt | http://alternativelyspeaking.ca

    • 11th February 2018 / 3:19 pm

      A happy medium is such a good way to look at it. So many people go missing that if the news were to report on it, they would be there all day telling us who is missing – completely agree!

  5. 11th February 2018 / 11:45 am

    Where did the McCanns get their money from? If people (i.e. the general public) want to give them money then that’s fair enough. And it would be interesting to know how their case differed from the ‘average’ case that only gets £2.5k (again, where is this money coming from?). It could be that the average case is easily resolved and doesn’t need a huge amount of resource.

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